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What are lingual braces?

April 22nd, 2020

Patients who want corrective braces but don’t like the look of traditional braces with the metal showing on the front have an alternative in lingual braces. As opposed to metal braces visible across the front of the teeth, lingual braces are placed on the rear of the teeth. Most of the metal in lingual braces is not visible to other people, unless you have widely-spaced teeth. For those who make good candidates for lingual braces, Dr. Jimmy Glenos and our team at Smiles by Glenos will tell you it is a great alternative with a significant cosmetic benefit.

Benefits of Lingual Braces

The primary benefit of lingual braces is that the metal is on the back of the teeth, which is very rarely seen by anyone. Patients can comfortably talk and smile, without the added worry of someone noticing the metal braces on their teeth. Another advantage of lingual braces is that they are just as effective as traditional braces and are worn for the same amount of time. They are also helpful for people who play contact sports or play wind instruments because lingual braces don’t get in the way. Finally, lingual braces are a great option for patients who have are sensitive to plastic and can’t wear other types of clear or invisible braces.

Who can get lingual braces?

While many patients qualify for lingual braces, not everyone who needs corrective orthodontic treatment will be a good candidate. The best candidates are teenagers and adults with normal-sized teeth. Children who get braces often have smaller teeth, so lingual braces may not be suitable. A patient’s bite also makes a difference, because a deep vertical overbite makes lingual braces difficult to place.

Talk to Dr. Jimmy Glenos the possibility of lingual braces if you’re thinking about correcting your smile but don’t like the idea of metal braces worn on the front. Lingual braces have the same basic benefits of straightening teeth, correcting misalignments, and fixing overbites and underbites that regular braces offer, but are a great aesthetic alternative.

For more information about lingual braces, or to schedule an initial consultation with Dr. Jimmy Glenos, please give us a call at our convenient St. Johns or St. Augustine, FL office!

iTero® Digital Impressions

April 15th, 2020

The iTero® Intraoral Scanner has revolutionized the way orthodontic impressions are taken. Now there's no need for messy, uncomfortable molds. Getting high-quality and accurate impressions has never been easier or more reliable.

When a patient comes to our St. Johns or St. Augustine, FL office for a consultation, Dr. Jimmy Glenos will need to take records of the person’s teeth and bite. Having a replica of a patient’s teeth and bite enables the orthodontist to plan out and visualize the most effective and timely treatment plan.

Traditionally, this was achieved by creating a plaster mold or cast. Putting the impression material and trays onto the teeth can be an uncomfortable process for many patients, especially those who have a sensitive gag reflex.

All that is history with iTero digital impressions. Our patients and team members alike love the speed and accuracy of the iTero Intraoral Scanner. We simply move the wand around your teeth and gums, and within seconds, you get a high-quality, accurate, and color digital impression. That’s all there is to it!

Here’s what patients love about iTero:

  • There are no messy and gag-inducing molds involved.
  • It’s quick, so the process doesn’t interfere with your busy schedule.
  • It’s painless and can be used on even the most pain-sensitive patients.
  • Impressions are saved in a digital format, so there’s no risk of molds breaking or needing to be recast.
  • Cutting-edge accuracy makes for more timely, comfortable, and effective orthodontic treatment.

Our St. Johns or St. Augustine, FL office is equipped with the latest iTero technology to make your office visit a breeze. So many aspects of our lives have been digitized and simplified, why should your orthodontic treatment be any different?

If you’re thinking about getting braces or clear aligners, iTero will optimize the experience and help ensure you get the best treatment you possibly can!

Crushing the Ice-Chewing Habit

April 8th, 2020

It's a habit many people have and not only can it be annoying to the people around you, it can be detrimental to your dental health. Chewing ice is so common that it even has its own name, pagophagia. We're not talking about a slushy or shaved ice (although those artificially sugary treats should be avoided too!) but more like the hunks of ice rattling around in the bottom of your glass.

Ice chewing can be a sign of emotional problems like stress or obsessive-compulsive disorder, but it can also be a marker for iron deficiency anemia and other physical problems. Then again, some people just like to have something to chew on. For whatever reason you find yourself chewing on it, it's a habit you need to break.

Chewing on ice can cause:

  • Chipped and cracked teeth
  • Damaged enamel
  • Sore jaw muscles
  • Damage to dental work such as crowns, fillings, or other appliances

If chewing on ice is becoming a problem in your life, don’t hesitate to speak with Dr. Jimmy Glenos about it. But if you find yourself still wanting to chew on something, here are a few alternatives to ice:

  • Baby carrots
  • Celery sticks
  • Sugar-free (xylitol) gum

We know you need to chill sometimes, but chomping down your entire glass of ice is not the way to do it. If you have any other questions on the topic, feel free to talk with a member of our St. Johns or St. Augustine, FL team. It may be beneficial in solving the issue and helping to remediate any damage to your teeth.

How does wisdom tooth removal affect orthodontic care?

April 1st, 2020

The purpose of braces and other forms of orthodontic treatment at Smiles by Glenos is to correct malocclusion, also known as crooked or crowded teeth, or “bad bites.” Past orthodontic practice dictated that wisdom teeth be removed, especially in cases of crowding.

The wisdom teeth are the last teeth to come in, and are officially known as the third molars. The teeth typically erupt, or break the surface of the skin, in young people between the ages of 13 and 20.

Sometimes, wisdom teeth are impacted. That means they cannot break through the gum tissue. This typically happens when the mouth or jaw is too small to accommodate the teeth. Impacted wisdom teeth can become infected, and some dentists and orthodontists may want to remove them as prophylaxis to prevent possible future infection.

Justification for removing wisdom teeth

Dr. Jimmy Glenos will tell you that in some cases, wisdom teeth attempt to come in the wrong way, either tilting in the jaw, or sideways. If the mouth is too small to accommodate these additional teeth, they inevitably become impacted. Swelling or infection of the gum flap above an impacted wisdom tooth may cause pain. The greatest danger is pericoronitis, a potentially dangerous infection that can occur in the gum area around an impacted wisdom tooth, or around a wisdom tooth that has erupted.

Orthodontists base their decision to remove wisdom teeth on each patient's individual circumstances. To learn more about the impact wisdom teeth have on orthodontic treatment, or to schedule a visit with Dr. Jimmy Glenos, please give us a call at our convenient St. Johns or St. Augustine, FL office!

904.79.SMILE